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8 delicious beers from around the world

By Nicholas DeRenzo
September 29, 2021
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Courtesy <a href="http://mybt.budgettravel.com/service/displayKickPlace.kickAction?u=24819546&amp;as=21864&amp;b=" target="_blank">cwgoodroe/myBT</a>

From September 17 through October 3—Oktoberfest is on! But why should the fun be limited to one little corner of one country? The original München boozefest is great and all—everyone should experience it once. But we have a hunch our readers traveling in other locales are itching for an autumnal brewsky, too. So we've rounded up our favorite varieties of beer from around the globe. Without further ado, here's the brew....

See also: Confessions of an Oktoberfest Waiter

U.K.

Oatmeal stout

This medieval beer caught on in the late 1800s because people believed the oats made it somehow healthful.

ASK FOR: Samuel Smith

TASTES LIKE: Molasses mixed with cream

GERMANY

Doppelbock

First brewed in the 17th century by Bavarian monks, it was used as “liquid bread” during Lenten fasts.

ASK FOR: Paulaner

TASTES LIKE: A Marmite sandwich on pumpernickel

FRANCE

Bière de garde

This farmhouse ale almost vanished during World War II, when brewery equipment was melted to make bombs.

ASK FOR: Jenlain

TASTES LIKE: Earthy, dry U.S. brews (quelle horreur!)

NORWAY

Juleøl

Dark and sweet, this ale is brewed at Christmastime and designed to stand up to hearty Scandinavian fare.

ASK FOR: Aass

TASTES LIKE: Whiskey spiced with cloves

FINLAND

Sahti

Brewed with juniper twigs since the 1500s, this hazy beer is one of the oldest varieties still made today.

ASK FOR: Lammin

TASTES LIKE: Fruitcake that’s heavy on the bananas

BELGIUM

Flanders red

This reddish ale gets its sour flavor from lactobacillus, the same bacteria used to cultivate yogurt.

ASK FOR: Rodenbach

TASTES LIKE: Apple cider mixed with grape soda

ITALY

Birra di castagne

Italy’s bounty of chestnuts has led to the birth of nut- infused ales, local alternatives to German-style lager Peroni.

ASK FOR: Birra del Borgo

TASTES LIKE: Bittersweet syrup, almost like grappa

RUSSIA

Kvass

A low-alcohol drink made with fermented rye bread, water, and mint or fruit. Coca-Cola now brews a version.

ASK FOR: Ochakovo

TASTES LIKE: Moderately sweet, grainy soda

MORE FROM BUDGET TRAVEL:

New York's hopping beer scene

Drink beer better

San Francisco: A guide for beer aficionados

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