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10 Beautiful Castle Hotels

By Nina Africano
January 25, 2011
Neemrana Fort-Palace_3
PhotosIndia.com/age fotostock
You don't have to be royalty to vacation like a king (or a queen). Turreted spires, stone archways, and centuries-old charm are all within reach. You just have to know where to look.

1. ASHFORD CASTLE

County Mayo, Ireland

With a spectacular setting of 350 acres full of towering woods and tidy gardens along the shores of Lough Corrib, Ashford dates all the way back to 1228. The 83-room gray stone castle was once the property of the Guinness family (yes, as in the beer), so it's practically Irish royalty. Transformed into a five-star luxury hotel in 1939, Ashford has since welcomed celebrities and discriminating travelers alike who come to experience not just exemplary dining and service, but also fresh-air fun: Riding, shooting, archery, and a robust game of golf are just some of the ways to fill your time during a visit here. Double rooms from $139 per person per night, 800/346-7007, ashford.ie.

2. PENTILLIE CASTLE

Cornwall, England

Built in 1698 by James Tillie, Pentillie Castle has had a fair share of drama—Tillie scandalously married the widow of his employer and still managed to squeeze a knighthood out of King James II. But its checkered past hardly detracts from Pentillie's enviable location on the banks of the River Tamar, not far from Plymouth. The yellow-hued castle is surrounded by gardens bursting with rhododendron, azalea, and camellia flowers, and most of the estate's 2,000 acres is still tenant-farmed, with some woodlands reserved for pheasant hunting. The hotel has nine double rooms, making Pentillie Castle a favorite location for intimate weddings. Double rooms from $75 per person per night (breakfast included), 011/44-1579-350-044, pentillie.co.uk.

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3. CASTLE OF THE FOUR TOWERS

Siena, Italy

This 807-year-old castle made of red brick has a commanding view of Siena from its hilltop position. Originally built as a private home in the 14th century, the castle's location turned out to be as strategic as it was picturesque, and the building served as a 15th-century fortress during the period of civil strife that the marked the region until peace was restored in the 16th century. Once again a private residence, rooms and suites can now be rented, including a spacious one-bedroom apartment that sleeps up to four people. Visitors can wander the maze in the garden or stroll in the olive groves or vineyards, or hop in the car and tour the rest of sun-kissed Tuscany. From $46.75 per person per night, sleeps up to four people, 011/39-339-497-7999; quattrotorra.it.

4. CHÂTEAU KRASNA LIPA

North Bohemia, Czech Republic

A nice Czech waltz is the only thing missing from the fairy-tale atmosphere at Château Krasna Lipa, located in Czech Saxon Switzerland. Built in 1886, this fanciful palace has turrets and Juliet balconies; not to mention gracious rooms with 14-foot ceilings, furnished with antiques, hand-carved furniture, and Rococo oil paintings. The surrounding area is home to lush forests that invite romantic souls to discover intricate rock formations—and crystal-clear lakes and rivers—also prime fishing areas. Now a vacation rental, the castle has eight luxury suites with private baths and flat-screen TVs—some suites have walk-out terraces with panoramic views. As with any dream trip, excellent service is a must, and Krasna Lipa delivers: Private tour-guides and interpreters are available to guests, as are pick-ups from Prague airport (80 miles away) or the nearby Decin railway station. Double rooms from $50 per person per night (breakfast included), 1/416-529-1523, romantic-chateau.com.

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5. SCHLOSS SOMMERSDORF

Bavaria, Germany

Any castle situated just off Germany's famed "Castle Road" has to earn its keep, and 803-year-old Schloss Sommersdorf does so by sheer longevity. The 14th-century structure endured a period of upheaval during the Thirty Years' War in the 17th century, but its graying façade, bricked turret and moat are still standing. Visitors can stay in three apartments or two rooms in the castle proper, or opt for more modern accommodations in the newly renovated Bohemian House, on the castle grounds. On the road between Niederoberbach and Grossenried, Schloss Sommersdorf is ideally located for exploring a portion of the 621-mile Castle Road—and there's a unique fleet of cars available for guests to rent, including a 1905 Cadillac, a 1913 Ford "Tin Lizzie," and a 1926 Durant Rugby R touring model. Double rooms from $56.50 per person per per night (minimum 3-night stay), 011/49-9805-91920, schloss-sommersdorf.de.

6. PARADOR DE CARMONA

Andalucia, Spain

Being a country with a strong Moorish history, Spain has thousands of castles. Narrow down the options with Paradores of Spain, a website that lists dozens of castles, fortresses, convents, and palaces throughout the country that have been converted into hotels. Our favorite, the 14th-century Arabic-inspired Parador de Carmona, is named for its town, about 18 miles from Seville. Inside, a graceful Moorish courtyard, vaults, and columns combine with antique Spanish furnishings to create a four-star experience reminiscent of times gone by. Deal hunters should check for discounts on multi-night stays (20 percent off) and for seniors (30 percent off). If you'll be exploring the area, consider purchasing the site's five-night card for $699, which is good at almost all Paradores and averages out to a discounted  $139 per night. Double rooms from $112 per person per night, 011/34-95-414-1010, paradoresofspain.com.

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7. CHÂTEAU DU PEYRUZEL

Aquitaine, France

Few castles that saw battle during the Hundred Years' War have come through as elegantly as the Château du Peyruzel, a 13th-century fortress about three miles from the town of Domme in the Dordogne wine region. From its location high on a hill, the château commands a view of the valley below, full of hay bales and cows; windows in all four towers let in copious amounts of sunlight. With massive stone walls hewn from bedrock, a five-story spiral staircase, chestnut floors, and ceiling beams of darkened walnut, the château screams "Middle Ages," but has been equipped with every amenity the 21st century has to offer: a 45-foot-long swimming pool, luxurious bedding and linens, satellite TV and Wi-Fi (and, perhaps most important: indoor plumbing). From $67 per person per night, sleeps up to 14 (reservations available by the week only), 1/916-837-0934; vrbo.com.

8. NEEMRANA FORT-PALACE

Delhi, India

For those venturing beyond the ancient feudal domains of Europe, there are still castles to be explored, such as this incredible 10-story fortification in Rajasthan, India. Completed in 1464, the Neemrana Fort-Palace's three-acre estate is built in a horseshoe shape into a hillside on the Delhi-Jaipur highway, about 62 miles from Delhi International Airport. The rooms are furnished with traditional Indian and colonial pieces and most have private balconies with views of the 60-mile-high Aravalli mountain range. Within the walls of the fort, guests can take a dip in the vista pool, sign up for free yoga and meditation exercises, or request holistic rejuvenation treatments. Double room from $38.50 per person per night, 011/91-941-405-0068, neemranahotels.com.

9. HOLLYWOOD CASTLE

Los Angeles, California

Like many things in L.A., the Hollywood Castle is playacting—it was built in the 1970s. But the castle's charm is still tangible, with ivy-covered walls, a moat with a drawbridge, and rooms furnished with suits of armor and huge thrones serving as chairs. Located on a full acre of land just beneath the Hollywood sign, the hotel has eight rooms (some with shared bathrooms) and three patios with 360-degree views of the sparkling city below, plus a Jacuzzi and a nightclub. From $83 per person per night for a two-bedroom, two-bathroom suite that sleeps up to six, 323/868-4076, thehollywoodcastle.com.

10. FAIRMONT LE CHÂTEAU FRONTENAC

Québec, Canada

Standing high on a bluff overlooking the St. Lawrence River, the turrets and towers of Fairmont Le Château Frontenac are part of the identity of Old Québec, which has been designated a United Nations World Heritage Site. Named after Louis de Buade, Count of Frontenac, who served as governor of New France from 1672 to 1682 (and again from 1689 to 1698), the Château Frontenac proudly displays the Count's coat-of-arms on the outside wall of the entry arch. Though the impressive castle looks positively medieval, the oldest section of the 618-room hotel, the Citadelle, dates back only to 1899. The Fairmont has been a bastion of gracious living ever since, with four-star service and renowned Chef Jean Soulard's in-house restaurant. Double rooms from 6;111 per person per night, 866/540-4460, fairmont.com/frontenac.

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Destinations

Reclaiming the Jersey Shore

Until late last year, it was hard to imagine how New Jersey's image could get much worse. Bon Jovi, 148 miles of turnpike, The Sopranos, Real Housewives—it all added up to a big-haired, acid-washed caricature of the state. Those of us from Jersey could do little more than shrug and laugh. I mean, Whaddayagonnado? But then, in December, MTV unleashed Jersey Shore. The wildly popular reality show, whose second season debuts this month, follows the summer-rental adventures of eight overtanned, overmuscled, undereducated young people in the shore town of Seaside Heights. No matter that "Snooki," "The Situation," and the rest of the cast mostly hail from places like Staten Island and The Bronx: It seemed that the trashiest place on earth had found the mascots it deserved. For someone who actually grew up on the shore, MTV's live-action cartoon was one insult too many. My fondest memories are dusted with sand and clotted with saltwater taffy. And while Bruce Springsteen's "carnival life on the water" might have been an overly romantic depiction even in the best of times, it was still my romance. I'll admit that the Jersey burbs can verge on the generic, but the 130 miles of beaches and towns along the coast are all color, from the wilderness of Sandy Hook to bed-and-breakfast-studded Cape May. And as I've been hearing, two of the shore's best-known towns—the once-glittering resorts of Asbury Park and Long Branch, both in my native Monmouth County—are in the midst of unexpected revivals. So as any spurned local might, I grabbed my fiancée, Jen, hopped a ferry from Manhattan to Atlantic Highlands, near Sandy Hook, and set out on a journey to redeem my home state's battered reputation. Of all the towns on the Jersey shore, Asbury Park is the most famous—and not necessarily for good reasons. Over the span of a few decades, the city transformed from flashy resort to gritty rock-music mecca to poster child for urban decay. Yet when Jen and I pull into town, it's as if history has somehow reversed itself. Our first stop is Convention Hall, just off the boardwalk. The hulking beaux arts structure was built with Jazz Age exuberance in 1929 to house acts like Benny Goodman and the Marx Brothers. Terra-cotta sea horses and serpents swim over its brick-and-limestone façade, and a copper model boat sits at its peak, a memorial to a cruise ship that ran aground here in 1934. Just three years ago, the venue, which once hosted the Doors, Janis Joplin, and the Who, was visibly falling apart, rotting in the salt air after years of neglect. But today, thanks to extensive restoration, it gleams like new and draws a fresh crop of big names—from Jeff Beck to Tony Bennett—to its adjacent Paramount Theatre. Over on the boardwalk, things are spiffed up and the same all at once. In a storefront, I spot the visage of Tillie, a leering, Alfred E. Neuman–like clown who is the closest thing Asbury has to a mascot; the character even inspired protests when a building with his image on it was torn down a few years ago. At the site of a once tragicomically decrepit Howard Johnson (TV host and chef Anthony Bourdain visited in 2005 and was afraid to order anything more elaborate than a grilled cheese), we duck into the bustling McLoone's Asbury Grille for a Bloody Mary before heading down the boardwalk to the Silver Ball Museum—home to 100 or so vintage pinball machines. Inside, it's a riot of bells and clanking metal, and we hand over $7.50 apiece for 30 minutes of unlimited play. In some senses, the story of Asbury Park's revival can be told through the Hotel Tides, where we're staying the night. Tucked away on a residential street, the hotel is an unlikely labor of love, as I learn when I meet co-owner Martin Santomenno. A real estate investor who was once maître d' at the World Trade Center's Windows on the World, Santomenno, along with a few partners, converted a dowdy guesthouse into a modern 20-room boutique hotel. "It started as a minor renovation, then it turned into a minor rehab, and then a major rehab," he recalls with a laugh. An airy lobby now doubles as a gallery that showcases work by Asbury-based artists. The rooms are smartly designed, with iPod docks, ultra-high-thread-count Anichini sheets, and rain-forest showers with river-rock floors. Santomenno began weekending in Asbury in 2001, a couple of years after a residential resurgence led largely by the gay and lesbian community. Attracted to Asbury by its cheap real estate, broad beach, and the 90-minute drive to New York City, these new residents bought big, run-down houses and restored them piece by piece. As the community grew, home owners lobbied for civic improvements and eventually opened businesses. Their vision of Asbury isn't just about tradition: Santomenno is far more excited about the time composer Philip Glass stopped by the hotel than when Springsteen's people scouted his house for a music video. "We consider ourselves a cultural center," he says. "People come to Asbury for the music, the art, and the food, not just for the beach. Right before last summer, 21 new businesses opened—we're keeping mom-and-pop stores alive." If Hotel Tides is a look at Asbury's future, then Vini "Maddog" Lopez is a part of its past. The original drummer in Springsteen's E Street Band (E Street is an actual road in Belmar, just to the south), Lopez joins us for breakfast the next morning at Frank's, a 50-year-old diner on Asbury's Main Street that, in his words, "has good mud." Lopez, grizzled and friendly, holds tight to his history: He currently plays in Steel Mill Retro, a band that re-creates the long-lost songs of the late '60s, pre–E Street days. He happily shares stories of nights at long-vanished clubs like the Student Prince and the Upstage, but he's quick to dismiss Springsteen's more fanciful visions of the city, heard in songs about wooing girls under the boardwalk. "There were rats underneath there," Lopez says. After saying our good-byes, Jen and I swing past Cookman Avenue, an up-and-coming stretch with an indie theater (think obscure and Swedish films) and some posh boutiques like Shelter Home, a home furnishings store co-owned by a textile designer who works on Broadway productions. From there, we turn our sights south. For 20 miles we bump through coastal towns like Belmar, Manasquan, and Point Pleasant, and then cut onto the Barnegat Peninsula, a spit of sand separating the Atlantic from Barnegat Bay, as we approach Seaside Heights, the now infamous home of Jersey Shore. For months, I've been hearing people talk about Seaside Heights as if it's some anthropology experiment, a case study in bumping clubs and boardwalk fights. But when we pull into town, it's clear that stereotypes don't hold. Instead of alcohol-fueled chaos, we find an unpretentious, kid-friendly resort town full of little cottages crowded up to the coast. It's not yet prime season, so things are pretty quiet. We pass the police station, where at least one Jersey Shore cast member was locked up, and cruise by Club Karma, now famous for cheap shots and dance music. Yet by the beach, it's as if the show never existed. A mini amusement park sits at either end of the mile-long boardwalk, and a Ferris wheel stands on a pier. Inside the 57-year-old Lucky Leo's Amusements, everything's familiar: the wooden skee ball lanes, the barker at the wheel of fortune, the paper tickets waiting to be traded for an endless selection of trinkets. The scene is timeless—a snapshot from the classic American summer—and it stands in contrast to our final destination, Long Branch. In many ways, Long Branch is the original shore town. The city began as a fashionable destination in the 1860s—well before Asbury or Seaside—starting with a visit from Mary Todd Lincoln, wife of Honest Abe. Then, like many other towns, it settled into prolonged decay. The final blow came in 1987, when the amusement complex on its pier (including a haunted mansion I never mustered the courage to enter) burned to the ground. All that remained were a few sad little arcades, seedy strip clubs, and the occasional music venue. That could've been it for Long Branch, but five years ago a local developer rebuilt the boardwalk and pier. Unlike the grassroots refurbishment of Asbury, the result here is a slick retail and residential complex called Pier Village, complete with upscale restaurants and bars, a bookstore, and a Gold's Gym (where we work out the next morning on treadmills facing the ocean). The Bungalow Hotel is one of the latest additions to Pier Village. The white-on-white rooms are hardly a bargain at $199, but given the fact that they could pass for ones at a $500-a-night Miami resort, they seem a worthy splurge, with South Beach–inspired faux fireplaces, faux-cowhide chairs, and Apple TV. With all the driving that afternoon, Jen and I had skipped lunch, so we immediately walk to Avenue, a glass-and-steel oceanfront restaurant that attracts young, hip-for-Jersey patrons—and at the moment, too many of them. The place is packed for happy hour. Instead of waiting, we decide to retreat inland. A few blocks from the beach, the flash of Pier Village mellows, and old-school Italian restaurants and simple hot dog stands remain as bulwarks against the city's new image. We opt for Tuzzio's, a squat brick-and-stucco establishment across from a dry cleaner. The crowd here (families of six and elderly couples) is anything but hip, and the same goes for the decor, highlighted by a stained-glass version of the restaurant's logo and gold-mirrored beer-company signs. But the leather booths are inviting, the vibe couldn't be warmer, and the food is a throwback: rich sausage and peppers in marinara sauce, and salad with special house dressing, a distinctly tangy blue-cheese vinaigrette. "If you don't like it," the grandmotherly waitress says with a smile, "I'll bring you something else." Back at the boardwalk, we eventually return to Avenue, which has quieted down. We sit at the polished-steel bar, where I get a dirty martini and a few oversize shrimp from the raw bar—we did skip lunch, after all. Jazz remixes play from overhead speakers. I bite into a shrimp, sip my martini, and feel a pleasant sense of disorientation. This is definitely not Snooki's Jersey Shore. It's not Bruce's, or at least not the one he sings about. It's not really mine, either. But for the moment, I'll take it. LODGING Hotel Tides, Restaurant & Spa 408 7th Ave., Asbury Park, hoteltides.com, from $95 Bungalow Hotel 50 Laird St., Long Branch, bungalowhotel.net, from $199 FOOD McLoone's Asbury Grille 1200 Ocean Ave., Asbury Park, mcloonesasburygrille.com, entrées from $8 Frank's Deli & Restaurant 1406 Main St., Asbury Park, 732/775-6682, sandwiches from $3 Avenue 23 Ocean Ave., Long Branch, leclubavenue.com, entrées from $16 Tuzzio's Italian Cuisine 224 Westwood Ave., Long Branch, tuzzios.com, entrées from $11 Max's Famous Hot Dogs 25 Matilda Terrace, Long Branch, maxsfamoushotdogs.com, from $3 ACTIVITIES Convention Hall Ocean Ave. between Asbury and Sunset Aves., Asbury Park, apboardwalk.com Silver Ball Museum 1000 Ocean Ave., Asbury Park, silverballmuseum.com, 30 minutes' unlimited play $7.50 Lucky Leo's Amusements 315 Boardwalk, Seaside Heights, luckyleosamusements.com Pier Village 1 Chelsea Ave., Long Branch, piervillage.com SHOPPING Shelter Home 704 Cookman Ave., Asbury Park, shelterhome.com

Destinations

Top U.S. Water Parks

1. WILDERNESS TERRITORY WATERPARK RESORT AT WISCONSIN DELLS, WI.  Near Madison, WI. (55 miles) The Wilderness Territory's most popular ride is the Hurricane: Riders experience the eye of the storm as they rapidly descend through a four-story funnel. Flashes of lightning, rumbling thunder, and drifting fog convey the sense of a full-blown natural disaster. Details 511 E. Adams St., Wisconsin Dells, Wis., 800/867-9453, wildernessresort.com. Kids eat free with adult purchase.Other Wilderness locations A new, 150-acre Wilderness resort in Sevierville, Tenn. Parks nearby Other water parks in Wisconsin Dells: Mt. Olympus Water & Theme Park and Noah's Ark. 2. KALAHARI RESORT, SANDUSKY, OH.  Near Toledo, OH. (60 miles) Kalahari doubled the size of the park in December 2007. The highlight is the Swahili Swirl. In a four-person inner tube, you'll be ejected from a steep tube slide into a 60-foot-diameter bowl; it's a dizzying three times around before you're sucked down the drain and dropped into a 50-foot-long landing pool. It's like a really fun toilet bowl. To mellow out, relax under the 40,000-square-foot clear Texlon roof, which houses tropical plants and allows guests to catch sun year-round.Details 7000 Kalahari Dr., Sandusky, 877/525-2427, kalahariresort.com. Look for "Beat the Clock" lodging specials on the website. Other Kalahari locations Wisconsin Dells Wis. And a new water-park resort is under development in Fredericksburg, Va. 3. AQUATIC BY SEAWORLD, ORLANDO, FL.  Near Tampa, FL. (85 miles) The signature experience here is the Dolphin Plunge, 250 feet of clear underwater tubes that plunge riders into a lagoon populated by charismatic black-and-white Commerson's dolphins. For a split second, you'll feel as if you're swimming with them. Aquatica's attractions include something for everyone: 36 slides, six rivers and lagoons, and more than 80,000 square feet of white-sand beaches.Details 5800 Water Play Way, Orlando, 888/800-5447, aquaticabyseaworld.com. 4. DAYTONA LAGOON, DAYTONA BEACH, FL.   Near Orlando, FL. (55 miles) Daytona Lagoon's most hair-raising experience is Blackbeard's Revenge. After you climb the 62-foot tower and mount an inner tube, you'll take a 15 mph, six-story tumble down a twisting, pitch-black tunnel slide. Don't miss the brand-new Kraken's Conquest, either: It's a four-lane, 55-foot-long ProRacer-series speed slide. Friends and families can challenge each other to high-speed, watery showdowns. Details 601 Earl St., Daytona Beach, 386/254-5020, daytonalagoon.com. The park offers a different special each day; for example, every Thursday you can get unlimited use of miniature golf, the carousel, and the rock-climbing wall from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. for $10. 5. WATER WORLD, DENVER, CO.  Near Boulder, CO. (30 miles) The 67-acre Water World's calling card is the Voyage to the Center of the Earth. Brave riders hop onto inner tubes and journey into the dark—where they're confronted by large, animatronic dinosaurs, including a 15-foot T. rex. If you're scared of the dark, but not much else, the TurboRacer might be more your style: Jump headfirst onto toboggan mats and race your friends down four stories, eventually launching—at more than 20 mph—onto a straightaway to the finish line. Each rider's time is recorded, so you can tell if you're the fastest waterstud in Denver.Details 1800 W. 89th Ave., Federal Heights, Colo., 303/427-7873, waterworldcolorado.com. Families can bring a picnic into the park; parking is free. 6. GULF ISLANDS WATERPARK, GULFPORT, MS.  Near New Orleans, LA. (77 miles) The most popular ride here is the Horn Island Blaster water roller coaster. The attraction ferries two riders at a time through more than 500 feet of twists and turns, including some thrilling uphill blasts at angles greater than 45 degrees. Families with young children might opt instead for the Ship Island Wreck, a slide for kids as young as 2. Details 13100 16th St. Gulfport, 866/485-3386, gulfislandswaterpark.com. 7. WATER PARK OF AMERICA, BLOOMINGTON, MN.  Near Minneapolis/St. Paul, MN. (13 miles) Given that it's adjacent to the gargantuan Mall of America, it's no wonder that the Water Park of America is a year-round attraction. The highlight is its mile-long indoor Whitewater Family Raft Ride, which propels riders over a river suspended 10 stories above the cars and trucks zipping along Interstate 494. Other standouts include an immense video arcade and the Trillium Spa— the latter for those who would prefer to skip the action.Details 1700 American Blvd. E., Bloomington, 952/698-8888, waterparkofamerica.com. The Radisson, which connects to the park, offers packages that include tickets. 8. SPLISH SPLASH, LONG ISLAND, N.Y.  NearNew York City, N.Y. (73 miles) The most popular offerings pitch you into darkness to up the thrill factor: Dragon's Den, Barrier Reef, Hollywood Stunt Rider, and the super popular Alien Invasion. The last ride begins by blasting your four-person raft down a steep slide before spinning it out of control and launching it into a dark pool. For raw intensity, try the Cliff Diver—you'll drop eight stories in three seconds. 'Nuff said.Details 2549 Splish Splash Dr., Calverton, N.Y., 631/727-3600, splishsplashlongisland.com. 9. MOUNTAIN CREEK WATERPARK, VERNON, N.J.  Near Trenton, N.J. (89 miles) Vertigo, a fully enclosed water coaster, cannons riders around tight curves in total darkness. Passengers on the park's signature ride, High Anxiety, drop four stories in the dark before entering into a funnel at breakneck speed.Details 200 Rte. 94, Vernon, N.J., 973/864-8444, mountaincreekwaterpark.com. Season-pass benefits include two bring-a-friend-for-free days and free parking. 10. RAGING WATERS, SAN JOSE,  CA.  Near San Francisco, CA. (50 miles) The 23-acre Raging Waters includes the winding, 60-foot-long Blue Thunder/White Lightning tunnel slide, and the newest attention-grabber, Dragon's Den, which catapults a two-person tube through darkness before a sudden, gut-wrenching drop into calmer waters. Details 2333 S. White Rd., San Jose, 408/238-9900, rwsplash.com. Other Raging Waters locations San Dimas (near L.A.) and Sacramento, Calif. (season passes are good for all three parks). 11. WET 'N WILD EMERALD POINTE, GREENSBORO, N.C.  Near Raleigh, N.C. (78 miles) Wet 'n Wild is well-known for its speed chutes like Daredevil Drop, with a hair-raising 76-foot plunge, and Double Barrel Blast, a ride which ends abruptly in midair—launching you from a four-foot edge before you hit the pool. Contrary to its name, Wet 'n Wild also lets you skip the water altogether: The Skycoaster combines the thrills of bungee-jumping and hang gliding, allowing up to three people at a time to experience the sensation of flying without getting even a little soggy.Details 3910 S. Holden Rd., Greensboro, 336/852-9721, emeraldpointe.com. Wet 'n Wild offers various promotions throughout the summer, from Girl Scout Day (June 20) and Home Educator's Day (August 20). 12. SPLASHTOWN WATERPARK, SAN ANTONIO, TX.  Near Austin, TX. (80 miles) The 20-acre Splashtown features more than 50 rides and attractions, from simple wave pools to true screamers, such as the five-story Hydras tube-slide tower and the aptly named Wedgie, a precipitous speed slide that tugs on your trunks like an 8th-grade bully as it fires you into the pool below. Details 3600 N. I-35, San Antonio, 210/227-1400, splashtownsa.com. Special events include magic shows and "dive-in" movie screenings. Parking is free.Parks nearby Other area parks include Schlitterbahn in New Braunfels, Texas. If you find yourself in Dallas, Bahama Beach is an option. 13. SIX FLAGS WHITE WATER, ATLANTA  Near Athens, GA. (73 miles) The nine-story Cliffhanger is one of the world's tallest free falls. It's so high that just peeking over the top might be thrill enough. But the signature ride is the Tornado, an intense four-person inner-tube nosedive of greater than 50 vertical feet—all while 5,000 gallons of water swirls around you. Details 250 Cobb Pkwy N., Marietta, Ga., 770/948-9290, sixflags.com/whitewater. Other Six Flags locations Six Flags has many Hurricane Harbor water parks adjacent to existing amusement parks; locations include Gurnee/Chicago, Ill.; Arlington, Tex. Eureka, Mo.; Jackson, N.J.; Valencia/Los Angeles, Calif.; Agawam, Mass.; and Largo, Md.

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